Hand sewing has been a laborious task for hundreds of years and many attempts were made to replace hand sewing before any significant impact was made on the process. Throughout the 1700's many ideas were developed and multiple people filed automatic stiching patents, but none lead to successful machines. Early machines used a method called the "chain stitch". The method is most credited to Berthelemy Thimonnier.

From the 1830's to 1840's came the introduction of the lock stitch which was much stronger than the chain stitch and it was less likely for the whole stitch to come loose. Sewing Machines were further developed by Isaac Merritt Singer. Singer was an engineer who improved the lock stitch designs created by Elias Howe. He then began producing machines, but hit a bump in the road when Howe took him to court for patent infringment. Howe won the case, but Singer survived and paid to license the machine. Today the Singer name is known for its long relationship with sewing machines and collectible Singer machines can cost a pretty penny.

Current machines continue to use a similar stiching process. However they have been greatly improved by the use of electric power and computer controls.

Bernina

Brother

Elna

Euro Pro

Husqvarna

Janome

Juki

Kenmore

Necchi

Pfaff

Shark

Simplicity

Singer

White

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